Sharing Hyperdocs: Canvas vs. Google Classroom

One tool I love for its versatility is the hyperdoc. They can be made using Google Docs or Google Slides, and it’s essentially a combination of content resources and a place for students to create their own work, all in one file.

I’ve shared them with students both by the force copy trick on a link in Canvas, and by sharing in Google Classroom so that each student gets a file. Both methods have their benefits; when sharing in Canvas (or another LMS), I can circulate the room while students are working, asking questions and giving feedback as they go, but students don’t submit their work until they are finished. In Canvas, Google files that are submitted are available to the teacher in a format almost like a screenshot, but it’s the whole file, not just one screen worth. Using Speedgrader, the teacher can quickly and easily scroll through a class’s work, scoring it on a rubric and making comments.

In Google Classroom, I can still circulate the room and give students feedback as they work, but in addition to that, the teacher has access to each student’s file from the moment it is created. My students recently worked on a hyperdoc when I was out of town for several days, and opting to share it with them via Google Classroom meant that I was able to provide them with comments containing encouragement or suggestions for improvement even though I wasn’t able to be present in class. Having to open each student’s file separately is a small inconvenience, unless using an add-on like Doctopus, or *gasp* paper and pencil, a rubric isn’t available, and for better or worse, the teacher sees student work whether it has been submitted or not. The positive to that is I was able to leave comments on work in progress, but the drawback is that it’s possible to score work that a student hadn’t quite finished.

Overall, I prefer the workflow available for scoring student work that’s available in Canvas, but the capabilities of viewing work in progress provided by Google Classroom. Assigning the work in both places and submitting the final product in Canvas is an option, but it sounds like it will be unnecessarily clunky. Students would need to look for comments in both places, and I imagine that a lot of kids will click “Turn it in” in Google Classroom and it will be missing in Canvas. No, it’s definitely best if I choose one place to disseminate my hyperdocs, and which one I pick may change depending on whether having access to student files throughout the process or having an easy way to score the work is more important for that task.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s