Sharing Hyperdocs: Canvas vs. Google Classroom

One tool I love for its versatility is the hyperdoc. They can be made using Google Docs or Google Slides, and it’s essentially a combination of content resources and a place for students to create their own work, all in one file.

I’ve shared them with students both by the force copy trick on a link in Canvas, and by sharing in Google Classroom so that each student gets a file. Both methods have their benefits; when sharing in Canvas (or another LMS), I can circulate the room while students are working, asking questions and giving feedback as they go, but students don’t submit their work until they are finished. In Canvas, Google files that are submitted are available to the teacher in a format almost like a screenshot, but it’s the whole file, not just one screen worth. Using Speedgrader, the teacher can quickly and easily scroll through a class’s work, scoring it on a rubric and making comments.

In Google Classroom, I can still circulate the room and give students feedback as they work, but in addition to that, the teacher has access to each student’s file from the moment it is created. My students recently worked on a hyperdoc when I was out of town for several days, and opting to share it with them via Google Classroom meant that I was able to provide them with comments containing encouragement or suggestions for improvement even though I wasn’t able to be present in class. Having to open each student’s file separately is a small inconvenience, unless using an add-on like Doctopus, or *gasp* paper and pencil, a rubric isn’t available, and for better or worse, the teacher sees student work whether it has been submitted or not. The positive to that is I was able to leave comments on work in progress, but the drawback is that it’s possible to score work that a student hadn’t quite finished.

Overall, I prefer the workflow available for scoring student work that’s available in Canvas, but the capabilities of viewing work in progress provided by Google Classroom. Assigning the work in both places and submitting the final product in Canvas is an option, but it sounds like it will be unnecessarily clunky. Students would need to look for comments in both places, and I imagine that a lot of kids will click “Turn it in” in Google Classroom and it will be missing in Canvas. No, it’s definitely best if I choose one place to disseminate my hyperdocs, and which one I pick may change depending on whether having access to student files throughout the process or having an easy way to score the work is more important for that task.

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How 1:1 Technology Changed My Classroom

This year, I was fortunate enough for my district to provide every student in my grade level a Chromebook that they could access throughout their school day.

First quarter, there were some hiccups. Not every student was allowed access for several weeks, as each student and their family attended the training regarding the expectations and acceptable usage of these devices, as well as the consequences for noncompliance. (Our technology lab is entirely comprised of Chromebooks, so students were already proficient on how to operate them.) Between this and all of the normal first quarter hullabaloo, I hardly used our Chromebooks, and I felt really guilty about it.

Around the beginning of second quarter, when things in the school year get a little less crazy, I began having students use their Chromebooks for pretty much everything. This was over the top, and not exactly best practices either.

For the remainder of the year, I’ve made it a point to strike a better balance, although it is still my preference for graded work to be turned in online, especially for tasks the take more than one class period.

Some of the benefits I’ve found of having 1:1 access to technology are:

  • Instant feedback for students – Whether students complete a self-checking quiz on Canvas/Google Forms, or work on a website that gives immediate feedback, students are able to realize their errors and correct their far more quickly than if they completed a worksheet and wait until I get around to grading it and hand them back.
  • Differentiation – A Google Forms quiz can be set up for students to be sent to a particular section depending upon how previous questions are answered, Canvas modules can be set up as Mastery Paths to give students “just right” work depending on their performance on the initial assignment. Obviously you don’t need technology to differentiate, but setting it up to run automatically is definitely a time-saver during implementation. I also like that it’s a little less obvious to students who is getting the easier work than it is when everyone has their paper on the table.
  • Save paper and copies – I have definitely used less paper than last year, and spent much less time standing at the copier waiting for it to print out the work for my class.
  • No lost papers – When you use less paper, there are fewer papers that can be misplaced! There is not a concern about whether you remembered to give a copy to the student who was absent the day a task was assigned, no making sure that you put that late paper in the same stack as the rest of the work from that task, and no one needing a second copy because they accidentally forgot their backpack at home that day. Students who are absent, sometimes return to school with the work they were absent for already completed. There is never a question about whether a student really did turn in an assignment, and work that has been turned in is marked with a time-stamp so you know exactly when it was submitted.
  • Paper planners are no longer the only way to keep track of assignments. – While some people function better with the paper planner, having work posted in Google Classroom or Canvas helps to keep track of assignments. You might only use it as a backup plan when the planner is forgotten, or as another layer of communication to keep families connected with what work students are doing in the classroom. Both Google Classroom and Canvas have a calendar function that show the due date for assignments. In addition to the calendar function, I have set up my Canvas classroom so that the landing page includes an embedded Google Slides file showing students what they need to work on that day, what work they can do to get ahead, and what students may do to keep learning when they have already completed all of the currently assigned work. I update that slideshow every morning before my class arrives so that I don’t need to embed new files each day.